[1] Mix the tartare, spoon it into the center of a romaine leaf, roll and enjoy (photo © Ardor Restaurant | Los Angeles).


[2] Sashimi-grade tuna loin (photo © Sea Delight).

Organic Romaine
[3] Look for baby romaine. You want something smaller than the large romaine leaves (photo © Good Eggs).


[4] Quail eggs (photo © To Table, a great resource for premium, hard-to-find ingredients).

[5] Anchovies. Use a quality brand or they may taste fishy. These are Agostino Recca, available on Amazon and elsewhere (photo © Vital Choice).

Dijon Mustard Maille
[6] Dijon mustard has the best flavor for a vinaigrette or dressing (photo © Maille).

 

We have a happy day whenever we discover a new and creative food preparation.

This one (photo #1), from Chef John Fraser of Ardor restaurant in Los Angeles, is a winner.

Chef Fraser does a mash-up of Korean barbecue and tuna tartare.
 
 
WHAT IS KOREAN BARBECUE

If you haven’t had Korean barbecue (BBQ), try to find it in your area—or come to New York City: We have tons of it!

Korean barbecue consists of thin slices of charcoal-grilled meat, served with a variety of condiments like ssamjang, a spicy paste of doenjang (Korean fermented soybean paste) mixed with gochujang (hot sauce/paste).

Place some paste on a romaine leaf, add the grilled meat, and roll it up burrito-style.

There are also side dishes, which you can eat from the bowl. Or, wrap some in the lettuce leaf with the meat.

A good restaurant serves at least five side dishes, called banchan.

Banchan can be anything the chef wants to serve, but typically consist of scallion salad, kimchi and pickled vegetables: cucumbers, daikon radish, peppers and other delight, like bean sprouts tossed with a bit sesame oil and garnished with toasted sesame seeds.

Banchan

Korean barbecue is low in calories, high in flavor, and one of our favorite foods.
 
 
MAKING KOREAN-FUSION TARTARE

RECIPE #1: KOREAN FUSION TARTARE

Make the tartare as a first course. Serve with saké, beer, white wine, green tea (especially houjicha) or Korean barley tea (boricha)—which is what you’d get at the restaurant.

Ingredients

  • Sushi grade salmon or tuna
  • Basil chiffonade or other herb (or thinly-sliced scallions if you’re not serving scallion salad)
  • Capers
  • Minced chives
  • Minced olives
  • Minced flat-leaf parsley
  • Quail eggs
  • Anchovy mustard (substitute rice vinegar-sesame oil vinaigrette or this lime vinaigrette)
  • Romaine leaves*
  • Option: any banchan you like
  •  
    Preparation
     
    1. MAKE the optional banchan: anchovies (if you don’t make the anchovy mustard) scallion salad, marinated cucumbers, radish, etc. Let the marinated vegetables sit overnight.

  • Here’s how to make pickled vegetables. If you like, you can toss red chile flakes, dill, etc. into any particular marinade.
  • Serve the banchan in small bowls, as they do in Korean restaurants.
  •  
    2. CHOP the fish finely, from sushi-grade tuna or salmon. You want very small pieces (see photo #1).

    3. PLACE the tartare in a bowl and add a cracked quail egg in the center. Top the tartare with the capers, chives, olives. Serve the anchovy mustard† on the side.
     
     
    RECIPE #2: ANCHOVY MUSTARD

    In addition to mixing some into the tartare, you can also use this dressing with green salads, fish, pork chops, grilled romaine, add it to a pan sauce, etc.

    If you don’t like anchovies, try this lime vinaigrette or simple a simple sesame vinaigrette with 2 parts olive oil, 1 part dark sesame oil, and 2 parts rice vinegar.

    Ingredients

  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 6 anchovy fillets, finely chopped (use a good brand—cheap brands are too fishy)
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 4 teaspoons fresh lemon juice, more to taste
  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and black pepper, as needed
  •  
    Preparation

    1. USE a mortar and pestle to make a paste of the garlic. Add a pinch of salt. If you don and have a mortar and pestle, use the flat side of a knife.

    2. WHISK together in a small bowl the garlic paste, anchovies, mustard and lemon juice. Slowly whisk in the oil until combined. Less oil creates a paste as in the photo. More oil makes a pourable dressing.

    3. TASTE and season with salt and pepper, and more lemon juice as desired (or use the zest).
     
     
    ________________

    *Look for baby romaine, or use the smaller center leaves of a regular head. Smaller leaves are the right size for tartare.

    †Mustard and anchovies are ingredients in a classic tartare.
     

     

      


    THE NIBBLE Blog – Adventures In The World Of Fine Food

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